Tag Archives: 2k14

Write-A-Thon

Need to know more about our write-a-thon? Keep reading!

Write-a-thon

November 22nd, 2014

9 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Fondulac District Library, Civic Complex

Come write with us! We’ll have donuts and coffee and snacks to get you started and keep you going.

The Civic Complex in East Peoria. It’s adjacent to the library, in the same building. There’s plenty of space and places to plug in your noveling device. Wi-fi is available.

Come and go as you have time! While the library is open, (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.), the doors are open and we’d love to have you for as little or as long as you can make it. After 5 p.m., we will move to the Conference Room inside the library, and we’ll finish out the Write-A-Thon lock-in style (participants may leave, but re-entry will not be allowed). Throughout the day, we’ll be hosting friendly word wars (fifteen minute spurts of writing frenzy) and ice-breaker style games to keep your energy levels up.

What about food? There are a ton of places to pick up lunch and dinner near the library in the new and growing Levee District. We also have a sign-up thread going on the official nanowrimo.org site for people who volunteer to bring easy-to-eat foods and snacks. At lunch and dinner times, we will also organize a meal order, so if you wish to participate please bring some cash and include tip for delivery.

Please join us! We’re keeping track of all the words we write—our word count poster will grow and grow and grow all day.

virtual write ins for november

Greetings, WriMos!

Our calendar is almost finalized (barring tornadoes, snowstorms, and the wayward zombie apocalypse). Tabby and I just added the virtual write ins for this upcoming month. Here’s a few things you ought to know about our virtual write ins.

What is a virtual write-in, exactly?

I’m so glad you asked! WriMos are invited to log into chatnano.net while you’re writing to chat with us–you know, cheer other WriMos on, commiserate about your plot bunnies, and in general remind yourself that you aren’t alone in this great big novelling challenge.

How do I register for chatnano.net?

Before you can actually get into our chatroom, you’ll need to register your NaNoWriMo name for the chatroom’s client. Instructions:

*****WRIMO REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS*****

WriMos who used the chat rooms last year should go to the login page. Newbies need to register first.

WriMos go to this URL: http://chatnano.net/IrcUsers/register_wrimo

  • Fill in Nick (same as here only with no spaces)
  • Choose region from drop-down menu
  • E-mail address
  • Password
  • Click Submit

​Once they are registered they ALWAYS login at http://chatnano.net/IrcUsers/login.

Put in the Nick and password they registered with.

If they prefer a client to Mibbit, they need to point their client at irc.kydance.net, port 6667, and login using the name they registered at the first URL given. If they are logging in using a client, they will need to enter their password when they do so. The command for this is /ns identify PASSWORD where they change PASSWORD to their actual password that they registered with.

What’s this Espresso Shot and why does it seem like Barb has a caffeine problem?

I plead the fifth, but I’m happy to tell you about Espresso Shots. On Friday mornings, I pledge to spend thirty minutes furiously writing. We’ll do some fun stuff, too, like weekly progress reports and the usual moral support.

What else is there to these virtual write-ins?

That’s it. A virtual write-in is us going into a chatroom. That’s really all there is to it. It may not sound like much, but writing can be a lonely venture, and writing a novel in a month even more so. A virtual space is important.

But if we’re chatting in a chatroom, we’re not really writing…

You got me there. That’s why no one is expected to spend the whole time yammering. Just sign in, say hello, and keep the chatroom running in the background so you can pop over to celebrate your victories and ask questions. Stay as long as you need, or just drop by to say hi if you like.

I hope to see you there!

Happy Writing!!

find your why

I still really, really can’t adjust to the idea that November 2014 is less than a week away. My son conveniently has a birthday on NaNoWriMo’s kickoff, so this time of year is always my reality check: time is flying.

Writing a novel in a month has become even more important to me, because the weeks and months go by so fast unless I commit to firm deadlines. I know December will be crazy busy with baking, revising another novel, and family. That leaves November as my last great sprint towards meeting my goals for this whole year.

That’s part terrifying, but also fairly exciting.

Last week at our Meet & Greet, I got to see a lot of familiar faces and some new ones. It was great. I love hearing about what other people are writing. I love that we’re writing together. This shared experience of ours makes writing even more fun.

This year, I’m writing the third novel in my modern-day fantasy series about clueless angels and sympathetic demons. And while that sounds like it’s not personal, it is. I’ve got some scenes planned that hit close to home–my own mistakes in faith and self-acceptance have to fuel the fire of this year’s NaNo novel.

That’s my advice to you, in case you thought I could get through a whole NaNoWriMo post without doling out bits of writing encouragement (pro tip: I can’t). Find what makes your novel important this year. It doesn’t have to be memoir or propaganda to be intensely personal and extraordinarily passionate.

But it ought to be passionate and personal. Find the why in your story, why you need to write it, why those characters exist, why someone else needs to hear these words. Hold fast to that why–you’ll need it when the what, the when, the where, and the how have abandoned you. You’ll have the why, and you’ll have the way.

peowrimos regional partnership

Hello, writer-types!

NaNoWriMo is just around the corner, and we’re happy to announce a partnership with two other NaNo-regions, Fredericton, New Brunswick and Seoul, South Korea!! We’ve got some fun stuff in store–virtual write-ins, word wars, and frenemy match-ups.

Want to sign up for a frenemy aka writing buddy from either Korea or Canada? Great! We have the link for you right here.

Stay tuned for more great NaNoWriMo events. 🙂

story prep workshop

I had a great time at yesterday’s workshop, WriMos!

In case you missed it, we talked about a lot of ways to plan and prep your story, because NaNoWriMo is just around the corner. Here are some links we shared, plus a few more, because I love arming you with resources:

Candy Bar Scenes — Holly Lisle’s website is a treasure trove of writing inspiration and information.
Snowflake Method — Advancedfictionwriting.com has novel design down to a science, or close to it as you can get. This method is great for plotters.
Scene and Sequel, MRUs — Advancedfictionwriting.com has another great article for how to structure scenes, both large- and small-scale.
Story Engineering Beat Sheet — Storyfix.com has some great resources for story planning as well as this beat sheet.
Jami Gold’s Website — all the fill-in spreadsheets and plotting devices you could dream of, and then some.

NaNoWrimo YWP Novelist Handbook — ignore the fact that these are for kids. No, really. There is some great advice in these pages, as well as some awesome printouts.
Scrivener NaNoWriMO 2014 Free Trial — Scrivener is offering a free trial of their writing software for this year’s NaNo, from now until December 7th. If you win, you get a coupon for 50% off.
Sacred Cow of Publishing: Writing is Hard — deanwesleysmith.com tackles the myth that writing is hard.
Sacred Cow of Publishing: Writing Fast is Bad — deanwesleysmith.com tackles the myth that writing speed = writing quality.

We’re about to get very busy, WriMos. November is coming–we are ready with write-ins, workshops, and a write-a-thon. Check our calendar at nanowrimo.org or on the calendar button at the top of this page. I can’t wait to see you there.

Happy Writing!

nanowrimo goodies

In the past, Literature and Latte (creators of Scrivener) have offered NaNoWriMo winners a coupon code for 50% off.

This year, they’re doing the same, but if you want to try Scrivener during NaNoWriMo, they’re offering a free trial (larger than their regular trial) so you can Novel away until December 7th.

I really like this software. To be fair, it’s the only special noveling software I’ve ever tried, but I like it. So if you want to give it a try, now’s a great chance to check it out!

Link to Literature and Latte

planning for November

Don’t let me panic you, but we’d like to start planning some of our events for NaNoWriMo 2k14.

I know, I know. November is still a long ways away. Thing is, our favorite places often get booked months in advance, and we want to be the group that does the booking.

So let’s here it. Where and when do you want to have write-ins?

IGNITE-logo-11

Ignite Peoria was so much fun!

We hosted two informal workshops for kids this afternoon.  We came armed with handouts and workbooks, and had a great time talking about some story basics!

Turns out, most of our audience was already well-versed in fiction mechanics. We spent our time talking about their experiences writing and how to trouble-shoot when they run into problems, deal with writer’s block, don’t know what to write next, or even how to deal with the dreaded inner editor!

I loved meeting each and every one of our young writers. To them, and to you, I wish you,

Happy Writing!

fingernail dirt

“Clutter and mess show us that life is being lived…Tidiness makes me think of held breath, of suspended animation… Perfectionism is a mean, frozen form of idealism, while messes are the artist’s true friend. What people somehow forgot to mention when we were children was that we need to make messes in order to find out who we are and why we are here.”

Anne Lamott, Bird By Bird

Camp is messy.

Building fires, cooking food on a stick, sleeping with spiders. Bug spray, sunblock, chlorine hair.  Raucous songfests with bawdy lyrics,  unrehearsed skits, telling jokes through quiet hour.

Going to camp means you’ll get dirt under your fingernails. Maybe even paint in your hair, too, and that’s okay, because whatever you’re making is fun to make and yours to enjoy. Nobody expects you to bring home a masterpiece from summer camp–just some stories and a promise that you had lots of fun.

I hope the camping/Camp NaNoWriMo analogy is clear enough.  I haven’t hit you over the head with it too hard, have I? Oh, apologies. I can’t resist waving these pool noodles around. Someone really ought to take them away from me before I–

Great, thank you.

This July, are you diving into Camp NaNoWriMo to have lots of fun?

I am. I’m not as prepared as I’d like to be. This NaNo novel will be splattered with paint and have smudges where I pressed too hard into the clay.

Right now, before I’ve gotten dirt on my elbows and the smell of sunblock permanently stuck in my nose, it’s easy to say “sure, I’ll just be happy with whatever mess I come up with, and love it.”

Give me about two weeks, and it’ll be much harder to accept how raw this draft will be.

But that’s my goal. A fun camping experience and something I can bring home proudly at the end of July. Hopefully, too, some  fond memories made with cabin buddies and some contraband chocolate.

Kumbayah, fellow campers, and happy writing.